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December 14, 2005

You'll need to click the link fairly quickly, since National Journal will be rotating it off soon, but centrist columnist Stuart Taylor, Jr. has another hard-hitting column on the unfairness of some sections of the media toward nominee Sam Alito. Taylor's catalogue of reporters' "factual distortions, tendentious wording, and uncritical parroting of misleading attacks by liberal critics" not surprisingly begins with the already notorious Knight-Ridder piece in which, according to reporter Stephen Henderson, "we didn't find a single case in which Judge Alito sided with African-Americans ... [who were] alleging racial bias." (In fact there have been at least seven such cases, Taylor says.) Taylor isn't k...

December 13, 2005

In my post yesterday on Alito and antitrust I neglected to introduce myself, so let me fix that now. I'm a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute who writes books and articles about the U.S. legal system, focusing especially on the high cost of our litigation system and how easy we make it to sue in this country. Among my other online activities, I edit the well-known websites Overlawyered and Point of Law, the latter of which has a subpage on Supreme Court nominations. Sean Rushton and Curt Levey have been particularly generous in inviting me to join the discussion here since I haven't always seen eye to eye with the Committee on the best way of framing the debate over this fall's judicial nominations. (Nor do I always see e...

December 12, 2005

The American Antitrust Institute, a group that tends to favor expansive interpretations of its particular legal specialty, sniped at nominee Alito a few weeks back as "not favorably disposed toward the private enforcement of the antitrust laws" (coverage then: David Giacalone, AntitrustProf Blog, PSoTD, (Anti)Trust Me, Donald Luskin, GreatAjax, Antitrust Hotch Potch). Now Philadelphia's legal paper, the Intelligencer, is out with an analysis by Carl W. Hittinger that analyzes Judge Alito's stance on antitrust issues, still not very sympathetically but in a more careful and detailed way than AAI (making clear, for example, that on the crucial issue of standing, i.e., who can sue, Alito has taken very much the same conservat...

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